planning08

 

We need to look at heeling a canoe.

If your boat sits in the water, level from side to side, as it moves forward, it will push an equal amount of water away from each side.

However, if you move across to one side, the boat tips.

As the boat tips, one side comes up out of the water, leaving a straighter waterline, and the other side gets more rounded as more of the side in the middle goes into the water....



As one side of the boat gets straighter, and the other curves more, only one side pushes water away, so the boat turns.

If you lean a bike to the left, it turns left.

If you lean a boat to the left, it turns right.

If you are running with wind on the side of a canoe, making manageable waves, you can tip the boat away from the wind and use the hull form to help counter the boats natural tendency to turn downwind.

Also heeling it away from the wind increases the amount of the side out of the water on the windward wave side.

This technique is likely to end up with the boat upside down the first few times you try it, so make sure you perfect it in the shallows - or on capsize drill day lol.

Heeling some more can lift the ends of the keel out of the water.

This effectively shortens the waterline length making the boat much easier to turn in its own length.

However....

If the bottom panel is flat, rather than V shaped towards the ends of the boat, its possible to get the front of the panel in the water in front of the keel, which can make the boat turn sharply in the direction the boat is heeled.

When you design your boat, you will need to look at this and decide if you want the boat to turn this way or just turn the other way progressively.

The control is the amount of twist you put in the ends of the bottom panel

This is the last animated pic, with the bigger heel at the end.

Not sure the angle is exactly right, as Ive not managed to see the waterline - other than when I managed to run myself over one day, but then I wasnt heeled.

So.....

Its time to have a look at what we have covered.

A boat can be pretty much any shape you like, but as far as cutting through water, some are better than others.

A boat has a bottom to stop ours getting wet and to stop our stuff falling out....




Pointing the ends makes clear water from its way more efficiently...



Lengthening it helps to point it....



Making the bottom narrower makes it more efficient...



Lifting the ends to give it rocker smoothes the waterflow under the hull, making it more streamlined...



Cutting the ends and creating a V shape while leaving the middle flat helps the boat track in side winds and one sided paddling and helps the hull resist reversing its heel steering as heeling is increased...



One or more angled sides can be added one above the other to widen the hull to resist heeling turning to uncontrolled rolling...


We now have a perfect displacement area...


....Well, that is until someone shoves a huge dog or the wife in the bow and it all changes shape or just sinks.

Er.....

Perhaps we should talk about sides, freeboard, displacement weights and the effect of adding cargo, lol.